‘Hycean’ Worlds: A New Candidate for Biosignatures? — Centauri Dreams — Imagining and Planning Interstellar Exploration

We’ve just seen the coinage of a new word that denotes an entirely novel category of planets. Out of research at the University of Cambridge comes a paper on a subset of habitable worlds the scientists have dubbed ‘Hycean’ planets. These are hot, ocean-covered planets with habitable surface conditions under atmospheres rich in hydrogen. The…

‘Hycean’ Worlds: A New Candidate for Biosignatures? — Centauri Dreams — Imagining and Planning Interstellar Exploration

Paul Gilster of Centauri Dreams writes not fiction, but analyses and discussions on the latest findings in deep space research. He unabashedly is a proponent of efforts toward interstellar travel, frequently writing about the reasons we should invest in such a future. In this piece, he discusses a new category of exoplanets, Hycean worlds, worlds which may have water surfaces under hydrogen atmospheres, and which could potentially support life under a wider range of stellar and planetary conditions than Earth-like worlds.

Within my own fictional imaginings, we have the Orta, a seemingly water-breathing species, though we don’t yet know where they come from. Perhaps their home planet is a Hycean world like those described here?

The curious tale of The Spinoff and the World Health Organisation

It’s not often I share tales from others, I admit, and even less so when those tales are not on the subjects of science, or fiction, or science fiction, or creative writing in general. This one, however, is a curious tale from someone I respect greatly of how creative communication helped an entire nation avert disaster, and how more of the same could well help the world.

Oh, and it’s completely irrelevant that the writer, David Brain, is the husband of my cousin. I’d respect him anyway for having the great good sense to marry my cousin (she’s fantastic, too), but in all respects he earns it completely on his own. However, I’ll let him speak for himself.

A few weeks ago I got a call from Duncan Grieve, the founder and managing editor of The Spinoff, the New Zealand online magazine of which I am a board member. “Can you join us for a call with the World Health Organisation. They seem to want us to help them with their Covid-19 public […]

via The curious tale of The Spinoff and the World Health Organisation —

Goblin Audiobook Review Copies — The Capricious Narrator

Gerhard Gehrke, whom I first “met” when he ran a contest for “Purple Post-Apocalyptic Prose,” and whose novels “Nineveh’s Child” and “The Minders’ War” I have thoroughly enjoyed, returns with something new and fresh. Goblins! Ok, yes, we’ve all heard of goblins before, but this is a fresh turn from an author whose writing typically bends to post-apocalyptic science fiction (see contest above). Granted, I have not yet had time to delve into “Goblin” myself, but I will! It promises to be a fun read, and from Gerhard’s posts about it, it certainly seems that he had a lot of fun writing it.

And, now it’s available as an audiobook! And if you’re into reviewing books (print or audio), you may be able to score a free review copy.

p.s. Gerhard also has short stories from the world of “Goblin” available to read (for free) on his website. Just follow the link below.

I have a limited number of free review copies for the audio version of Goblin. If you’re interested and able to leave a review, please let me know. I’m giving priority to anyone who has left prior reviews for any of my books. The copies are for the U.S. and U.K. Audible service only. Actor […]

via Goblin Audiobook Review Copies — The Capricious Narrator

Eulogies

Why have I been so quiet lately, you ask?

I have been a little busy, dealing with a bit of a family emergency. However, I have not gone away. You’re not getting rid of me that easy! But, if you would like to know a little more (warning: this has nothing to do with science fiction, nor fiction of any kind, but it does involve a little writing), delve a little further into my own personal life, then I invite you to take a peek at my other, older, and until today much dustier, blog.

I don’t advertise the existence of that blog very much, because it has no real meaning except for my own family and myself. Strictly speaking, it’s a genealogy blog, but it’s also a blog where I share thoughts on things going on within my own life.

Until today, I had not written anything over there for five years. The last few posts I had written all had to do with the death of my father, six years ago, and my experience as executor of his estate.

And then a month ago, my mother passed away. And now I am writing about that.

I’ll have more to say before I’m done with that subject, and then I will be getting right back into the thick of it over here, but meanwhile, feel free to peel back the covers of my life and see what lies hidden away.

It starts on February 6th. That is the day the office at your mobile home park, where you have lived for twelve years, calls your daughter to express their concern. It seems you forgot to pay the rent for the space your home sits in, and in twelve years this had never happened before. You are in the habit of visiting the clubhouse each day, making a pot of coffee, and chatting with the manager there, but on this day you seem to have trouble with the coffee pot, and when the manager asks you about the late rent, you don’t know what she’s talking about.

Read the rest at https://clan-fraser.org/2019/04/06/eulogies-part-1/


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